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Fast Track to Sales Leadership Success with Gary Guymon

Transcript
Wesleyne Greer:

Welcome to another episode of the transform

Wesleyne Greer:

sales podcast today. I am so excited to have Gary Gaiman with

Wesleyne Greer:

me today. How are you, Gary? I'm doing well. And thanks for

Wesleyne Greer:

having me. How are you doing? Well, I'm doing well. Let me

Wesleyne Greer:

tell you a little bit about Gary. He was born in Santa

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Clara, California, and he grew up all over California. He

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played sports, ran track and played football and was an

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editor of the literary magazine. He started in accounting firms

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center all around the California Enterprise Program. He is now a

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sales manager at expert net. So, Gary, tell us how did you go

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from playing sports traveling around the state to becoming a

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sales manager? Yeah, so Well, I played sports in high school, I

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mostly coached in college, I ran a little bit of club track, and

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competed on that level. But I never ran collegiately. But I

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interned while I was in college at a tax accounting firm. And

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they specialize in the California enterprise zone,

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which really helped out economically distressed areas

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throughout California to help give them a tax credit. And it

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was something that that was very fulfilling. And it gave me an

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opportunity to have a career coming straight out of college

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and one of my mentors at the tax accounting firm, elected to

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start a new firm with me. So I got licensed as a tax preparer.

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And we started from the ground up, no customer base, no

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anything, just figured we could figure it out as we went along.

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And we built it from nothing and sustained it for about seven and

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a half years when the governor of California did elected to

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shut down the program. And my business partner at the time

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wanted to convert our tax firm into just a traditional

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accounting firm, which wasn't really something that I wanted

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to do. So I elected to sell him my portion of the company. And I

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just uprooted and went to Seattle, Washington, one of my

Wesleyne Greer:

buddies played football for the University of Washington and

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convinced me to move up there. So I went up just kind of took a

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retail job, sort of on a hiatus to figure out what I wanted to

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do. And my next career steps and I was contacted by a

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telecommunications company called NTT communications.

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They're a Japanese company, fortune 100. And I had never

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heard of them before. So I did some some research, it was very,

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very interesting. I'm the kind of person who likes to take

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opportunities based on how much I can learn and can grow in that

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industry. And being that the job that was presented to me was

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centered around the internet. And the internet is changing

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every single day. I mean, the growth potential is limitless.

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So I kind of jumped at the opportunity started at the

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bottom from an inside sales rep, and worked my way up to a global

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account manager. And then I was recruited by exponet, who was a

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customer of NTT communications. So I really hit it off with the

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CTO, they flew me out to Los Angeles to meet the CEO. And

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then we hit it off as well. I think my interview was about

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like seven or eight hours while I was down here, was went from

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dinner to rooftop of the building to just everywhere,

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just talking. And then needless to say, I accepted the position.

Wesleyne Greer:

But I originally started as a global sales manager, and then I

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worked my way up to what I am now as a VP of sales. So your

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journey in life, you started out as a as an accountant, and then

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you decided, okay, I don't want to do this anymore. I'm gonna

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take a different step. And you took a huge leap and just move

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to another state. So when you move to another state, and you

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decided to get into retail, did you miss anything about being in

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that accounting world? I think I kind of missed the just going

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after the customer base. I mean, you work in a retail store,

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people just walk in, they have a specific need. And your only job

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is to sort of upsell them, there is no real like, hunting

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involved in that. And I missed that. Because I mean, that was a

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huge part of what we did is we were cold calling going door to

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door back when that was still relevant. And that part of it

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was something that I found to really love and I missed that in

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the retail aspect of selling. You like cold calling. I don't

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know how many people that I can say hang their hat on. I missed

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cold calling when I had to cold call. I missed it. I don't think

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that's something a lot of people say. So getting into retail,

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then you move back into that business to business space. So

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what lessons did you extract from that retail sales

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environment that you actually employed when you worked for

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NTT?

Gary Guymon:

I think it was just being more personable. That was

Gary Guymon:

something I struggled with originally in my career path,

Gary Guymon:

but being in retail, you have to be personable otherwise You will

Gary Guymon:

not be successful. And that's something I kind of carried with

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me and I, I learned to kind of develop a sales style of selling

Gary Guymon:

myself and making sure that I'm a likable person and earning the

Gary Guymon:

trust of a customer, as opposed to trying to sell them a

Gary Guymon:

product, because I think most people have an idea of what they

Gary Guymon:

want anyway. So it's whether or not they trust you in what

Gary Guymon:

you're selling. And that's kind of something I learned in the

Gary Guymon:

retail world. That's so good. The likability the trust factor,

Gary Guymon:

because you're right, if I'm walking into a retail store, I

Gary Guymon:

can go next door and get the same thing. So why do I stop and

Gary Guymon:

say, Here's my credit card buy from me? And a lot of times in

Gary Guymon:

the b2b sales world that doesn't quite translate, it's like, ah,

Gary Guymon:

yeah, well, this is what I want to I want you to buy this, buy

Gary Guymon:

this buy this, it's all about the products. It's all about a

Gary Guymon:

future dump. But it seems like you took the those key skills

Gary Guymon:

you learn in the b2c world and translated them to the b2b

Gary Guymon:

world. That's correct. Yeah, I learned pretty quick too, at

Gary Guymon:

NTT, that most of the people that you're pitching and trying

Gary Guymon:

to sell know your product better than you do as a sales rep being

Gary Guymon:

that they're all technical. And they have to be very, very

Gary Guymon:

knowledgeable in what they do. So they're buying because at

Gary Guymon:

NTT, we were selling wholesale internet. And that product is

Gary Guymon:

something that they need to be well versed in. So for me to try

Gary Guymon:

to speak to them on their level is not something that I could do

Gary Guymon:

as a sales rep, starting out. So the only really selling point

Gary Guymon:

that I had was myself, and I just built my career off of

Gary Guymon:

that. That's good. That's so good. Because a lot of times in

Gary Guymon:

our technical realm, I was actually just working with a

Gary Guymon:

client today. And she was like, what, Wesleyne? I don't know

Gary Guymon:

this as much as they do. And I don't know this, and I don't

Gary Guymon:

know that and I'm like, Yeah, okay, you know, your world, they

Gary Guymon:

know their world, right? So let them stay in their space, and

Gary Guymon:

you have to bring value, you have to add things to them so

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that they're like, okay, this person isn't trying to act like

Gary Guymon:

they're the expert, like they know more than me, right?

Gary Guymon:

They're really just trying to help me achieve a goal that I

Gary Guymon:

want to accomplish. Right? Yeah. I've always found too, that

Gary Guymon:

coming from a sales rep, trying to be technical, trying to

Gary Guymon:

engulf yourself into a customer's world is almost a

Gary Guymon:

disservice. Right? It comes off kind of shady, almost in that

Gary Guymon:

you're trying to act as you're involved in their world. Whereas

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if you have a technical person, like a sales engineer speaking

Gary Guymon:

to what they do, it's almost trusted more. So I mean, it's

Gary Guymon:

kind of taking a step back, swallowing it a little bit of

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pride and just allowing things to organically move forward, as

Gary Guymon:

opposed to trying to overstep and speak about something you

Gary Guymon:

don't necessarily know about. Yeah, like you literally, you

Gary Guymon:

have to stay in your lane. And so you came from a very

Gary Guymon:

different world accounting than retail, and you stepped into

Gary Guymon:

this telecom world, and somebody saw something in you. And they

Gary Guymon:

said, Oh, yeah, you're pretty good at this, we want you to. So

Gary Guymon:

how did that marathon eight hour interview to walk me through

Gary Guymon:

that process? What was that like?

Wesleyne Greer:

Well, it was kind of intimidating at first.

Wesleyne Greer:

So they put me up at a hotel across the street from the

Wesleyne Greer:

office. And I walked in kind of expecting to just be greeted,

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you know, by reception, or be sat down and then just go into a

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room like a traditional interview. And I walked in, and

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I was greeted, and they took me around on a tour through a data

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center, which I was not expecting at all. But extranet

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owns and operates a 10,000 square foot data center. And

Wesleyne Greer:

I've been to a few I've been to New York, I went to one 11/8,

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which is now owned and operated by Google, and the security

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level at our data center was a lot higher than anything I've

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experienced. So that initial aspect of it was pretty

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intimidating. And then just coming in, I went into the CEOs

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office and he sat me down he had a couch in his in his office and

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that was kind of where the interview started. And it threw

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me off a little bit just the comfortability, this the person

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ability in the interview, but he's extremely friendly,

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extremely likeable, kind of ease any sort of stresses from the

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get go. And we just started chatting he was he was first

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trying to pick my brain trying to see how much I understood

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about the industry, how much I understood about his business

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versus what NTT offered, I mean, coming from a fortune 100

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company to a company that's not even publicly traded. It's a

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huge change in environment, not only in, in status of the

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company, but also in the customer base that you're

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targeting. So he was trying to grasp whether or not I would be

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able to make that adjustment and if I'd be successful at his

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company, so once he was able to determine that he brought in the

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CTO who picked my brain on a more technical level, we start

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We're talking more about the ins and outs of what IP transit

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actually was versus peering relationships, which is just a

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different component of the internet. And we talked back and

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forth on how we could grow the company with our goals kind of

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aligned, and it would be a good fit. And then he just took me

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out to dinner where we kind of just continued conversations,

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and at the end of the day, he ended up extending an offer. So

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it's almost like they, yes, they were interviewing you. And

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they're kind of trying to sell you too, right? And especially

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in today's job market, where we are I mean, this is an

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employee's market, right? I don't even know if that's a

Wesleyne Greer:

coined term, but it is this is an employee's market. So as

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leaders, when we think about, okay, how can I provide a

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different experience for a candidate that I know I want?

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And so maybe it's not like, Hey, you come into a hotel, and you

Wesleyne Greer:

spend the whole day with us, but really getting to meet with

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upper leadership and understanding from upper

Wesleyne Greer:

leadership? These are our goals, this is our mission, these are

Wesleyne Greer:

our values. Would you say that those things are we have reasons

Wesleyne Greer:

why you decided, hey, I'm gonna move on back to California, I'm

Wesleyne Greer:

gonna take a different step. Oh, yeah, for sure. I think that

Wesleyne Greer:

just how much we kind of hit it off from an environment

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standpoint, and just how welcoming how friendly

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everything was, how easygoing the environment was, was very

Wesleyne Greer:

appealing to me at the time, it still is, it's still something

Wesleyne Greer:

that I value more than anything. And also going through a

Wesleyne Greer:

pandemic at a company, you're always worried on how they're

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going to handle things. And it's translated, you know, through

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the years to where my upper management has allowed me to

Wesleyne Greer:

work from home. Just been super accommodating to every concern

Wesleyne Greer:

that we've ever had. And just, it's really something that they

Wesleyne Greer:

sold and lived up to while being there at the company. So I was

Wesleyne Greer:

the next question, I was going to ask you the difference

Wesleyne Greer:

between that large, publicly traded company and your company,

Wesleyne Greer:

because again, a lot of people are in that transition point in

Wesleyne Greer:

their career where they're looking for something different,

Wesleyne Greer:

something new, what would you say the pros and cons of both

Wesleyne Greer:

sides are?

Gary Guymon:

Well, I think the pros of being at a smaller

Gary Guymon:

company is probably there's a lot more more freedom to what

Gary Guymon:

you're able to do. And I say that because you can build case

Gary Guymon:

studies, you can build how you pitch things, whereas when

Gary Guymon:

you're at a fortune 100 company, it's more scripted, they have an

Gary Guymon:

idea of how you want to pitch things, how they want you to

Gary Guymon:

operate, how you have to manage certain customers, or whatever

Gary Guymon:

it may be. And that responsibility, I think that

Gary Guymon:

that can be deterring unless it fits your sales style to have

Gary Guymon:

everything sort of planned out for you. For me, that is kind of

Gary Guymon:

deterring, I like to kind of fit my sales style to the customer,

Gary Guymon:

as opposed to just having something kind of planned out

Gary Guymon:

and how you approach every single person. I think it's

Gary Guymon:

very, very subjective. And I think that's kind of lost that

Gary Guymon:

at a larger company, you don't you don't have the freedom to be

Gary Guymon:

able to talk to people that way. I think a con is always you're

Gary Guymon:

worried about stability? Are you worried about being bought by

Gary Guymon:

another company? Like if there's a merger, if there's an

Gary Guymon:

acquisition, how is that going to change my life? Am I still

Gary Guymon:

going to be employed am I going to be out of a job, you know,

Gary Guymon:

and all of those things go on behind the scenes, and you may

Gary Guymon:

or may not be privy to it, depending on your status at the

Gary Guymon:

company. And depending on how transparent leadership is with

Gary Guymon:

you. I think that's probably one of the more bigger concerns I

Gary Guymon:

had. Initially. It's not something that I share now. But

Gary Guymon:

the biggest thing is just finding the right fit for you

Gary Guymon:

and what you want in your career path. Yeah, I was speaking with

Gary Guymon:

someone who is looking for new people within the organization.

Gary Guymon:

And when I was talking about to them, I'm like, Hey, you have to

Gary Guymon:

remember you're a large enterprise. If you find somebody

Gary Guymon:

who's come from like a startup realm or a smaller company,

Gary Guymon:

they're used to doing things, marching off their own beat,

Gary Guymon:

that doesn't happen here. There's a lot of red tape.

Gary Guymon:

There's a lot of stuff that a salesperson has to go through in

Gary Guymon:

order to get something done. So you really want to think about

Gary Guymon:

the culture fit is not just what you can do, but that culture fit

Gary Guymon:

is going to help you get employees and keep them much,

Gary Guymon:

much longer. Right. Yeah, no culture is a huge part of it. I

Gary Guymon:

mean, even at NTT, there's a lot of things like you had to

Gary Guymon:

dissect each opportunity. You had to dissect calls. They were

Gary Guymon:

part of a Miller Heiman process, if you're familiar with that,

Gary Guymon:

where you fill out green sheets for calls and you have to

Gary Guymon:

outline what the reason is for having the call. He had blue

Gary Guymon:

sheets for opportunities and it's just all of that is

Gary Guymon:

extremely valuable if you use it correctly, but can be extremely

Gary Guymon:

tedious if you're applying it to just like say like an

Gary Guymon:

introductory call, which you're required to do, right. But yeah,

Gary Guymon:

here at extranet that's not part of my process. There are Some

Gary Guymon:

elements that I've taken from that and still use, but I don't

Gary Guymon:

think all of it is applicable or necessary in every single

Gary Guymon:

opportunity. Well, yeah, one of the great things about sales

Gary Guymon:

leadership is you're like, I really like this, but I really

Gary Guymon:

don't like that. So I'm not gonna ever do that, again, I'm

Gary Guymon:

not gonna make my team do that, because it's just so annoying.

Gary Guymon:

So tell me about your ascent from individual contributor to

Gary Guymon:

leader? Because it seems like it happened pretty quickly with you

Gary Guymon:

moving to extranet. Yeah, so just starting out, I started out

Gary Guymon:

pretty successful at the company, not nearly as

Gary Guymon:

successful as I was hoping to be, but to say the least, they

Gary Guymon:

were happy with my performance. And I kind of put together a

Gary Guymon:

proposal to create a position which was VP of sales,

Gary Guymon:

everything kind of operated independently, whether that was

Gary Guymon:

channel whether that was just outside sales, or inside sales.

Gary Guymon:

And I wanted to kind of put everything under one umbrella

Gary Guymon:

and expand and start hiring people. So I put together a

Gary Guymon:

proposal, I pitched my boss, and he was all for it, he was

Gary Guymon:

actually thinking of doing something similar to what my

Gary Guymon:

proposal was about. But he said he loved the idea. And let's

Gary Guymon:

just run with it and see where it goes. Hmm, being your own

Gary Guymon:

advocate. So often, employees, people just sit back and they

Gary Guymon:

wait for the company to say, Okay, there's a new position

Gary Guymon:

we've created. But if you never speak up and use your words, and

Gary Guymon:

say, This is the vision I have for the organization, then how

Gary Guymon:

will you ever be thought of as a leader, if you're not thinking

Gary Guymon:

about leadership initiatives? So you said, this is the plan I

Gary Guymon:

have? This is what I want to do. And your boss said, Go do it. So

Gary Guymon:

how did you start building this organization? Starting with,

Gary Guymon:

okay, it's me, but I want all of these people. Can you say that

Gary Guymon:

again? So how did you go about taking the plan that you gave to

Gary Guymon:

your leader to say I want to make the sales organization and

Gary Guymon:

what were some of the first things that you did to start

Gary Guymon:

building out the sales team.

Gary Guymon:

So I put together a plan to hire employees, I put together a

Gary Guymon:

bunch of ROIs on when he can see his return on investment. And

Gary Guymon:

then I also I put together a bunch of training materials, a

Gary Guymon:

company story, started putting together marketing plans that I

Gary Guymon:

was, I was hoping to accomplish to give all sales reps sort of a

Gary Guymon:

head start in obtaining the goals that I had set out for

Gary Guymon:

them. So I built a company story, I built a training deck

Gary Guymon:

going over every single service that we offer, and just sort of

Gary Guymon:

presented this all to him to where I was able to implement it

Gary Guymon:

just from the start. And just any person that we on boarded

Gary Guymon:

was able to go through these training materials and just have

Gary Guymon:

a whole process put in front of them to hit the ground running

Gary Guymon:

and be successful from day one. Wow. So you really focused on I

Gary Guymon:

want to build a house before the people actually come right. You

Gary Guymon:

wanted to give them the infrastructure. And I think that

Gary Guymon:

that's something that so many organizations miss. It's like,

Gary Guymon:

oh, no, no, we'll hire all the people. And then we'll figure

Gary Guymon:

out what they do when they get here. Right? No, I think that's,

Gary Guymon:

I mean, it works for some people, right. So I mean, even

Gary Guymon:

when I came on board, extranet it wasn't, there wasn't a plan

Gary Guymon:

in place. And it was sort of like, here's your desk, get to

Gary Guymon:

work kind of ordeal. And I was fortunate to already have a

Gary Guymon:

relationship with the CTO, so any questions that I had, or any

Gary Guymon:

anything that I felt that I need training on, he was very

Gary Guymon:

communicative, and in gave me that opportunity. Whereas I

Gary Guymon:

don't I don't think, had it been a different situation where I

Gary Guymon:

didn't know him as well as I did. I could have been as

Gary Guymon:

successful as I was to start. So I wanted to make sure anybody we

Gary Guymon:

onboard, it had that opportunity to just start and just be

Gary Guymon:

confident in what they were pitching and be successful. So

Gary Guymon:

as you've gone through this journey of building this team

Gary Guymon:

from scratch and building all their playbooks and collaterals

Gary Guymon:

what are some of the challenges that you had to overcome? Um, I

Gary Guymon:

think it's a it's just kind of learning how to work with

Gary Guymon:

people, because everybody's different, you know, you can't

Gary Guymon:

treat everybody the same. Some people like, like tough

Gary Guymon:

encouraged me, they like to be called out on what they what

Gary Guymon:

they're doing wrong. Some people like to stop positive

Gary Guymon:

reinforcement. I think that that has been my my biggest struggle

Gary Guymon:

is trying to learn how to speak to everybody. Because if you

Gary Guymon:

treat everybody the same, then you're going to fail and people

Gary Guymon:

you're going to have a lot of churn in your organization. So

Gary Guymon:

trying to understand that in training, I think focusing on on

Gary Guymon:

where people are not understanding everything and

Gary Guymon:

focus more heavily on that has been been a little difficult,

Gary Guymon:

and then just being able to provide assistance while while

Gary Guymon:

doing my own job as well. So I like to accompany sales reps on

Gary Guymon:

phone calls whenever they need support, and also just continue

Gary Guymon:

doing my job. So balancing everything, it's been a bit of a

Gary Guymon:

struggle, but making it work. Yeah, and one of the things that

Gary Guymon:

I really love to say is that every salesperson is an

Gary Guymon:

individual. And because they're all individuals, every single

Gary Guymon:

person on the team needs to have their customized coaching plan.

Gary Guymon:

So you as a leader know how to best show up and serve them to

Gary Guymon:

help them achieve their goals. And it seems like very early on,

Gary Guymon:

you realize that and you adjusted your style for each

Gary Guymon:

person on the team. Yeah, no, I like to, I like to ask people

Gary Guymon:

what it is that they're really trying to accomplish in life,

Gary Guymon:

not in the company. And like, for one example, I had a rep who

Gary Guymon:

wanted to buy a home in a year. So I broke everything down,

Gary Guymon:

asked him how much the home would cost, how much money he

Gary Guymon:

wanted to put down and just kind of laid it out. And I said,

Gary Guymon:

Okay, well, here's your goal for the month, I'm like, Don't worry

Gary Guymon:

about your quota, because your quota is less than what you need

Gary Guymon:

to hit to be able to accomplish this in a year. And I said, so

Gary Guymon:

this is what you want to accomplish, then go ahead, let's

Gary Guymon:

work towards it, let's find a way to make it happen. And

Gary Guymon:

people are more receptive to achieving something that means

Gary Guymon:

something to them than being motivated by fear. If you don't

Gary Guymon:

hit your quota, you're going to be fired kind of motivation is

Gary Guymon:

it works, but I don't think it's the best way to approach

Gary Guymon:

managing people. So like I said, with this particular instance,

Gary Guymon:

he had a goal in mind to buy a home, which would have put them

Gary Guymon:

at 150% of quota anyway, so why not make that his goal? That's

Gary Guymon:

powerful. That is powerful. You have had such a diverse career,

Gary Guymon:

from accounting to retail sales, to really creating your own

Gary Guymon:

team, what is the thing that you are most excited about having

Gary Guymon:

accomplished either personally or professionally in your life?

Gary Guymon:

That's a tough question. I'd say probably personally, just being

Gary Guymon:

a father. So I have two kids, I like to think that I'm teaching

Gary Guymon:

them the things that I wish that I had when I was a child and

Gary Guymon:

helping them grow into a responsible and just healthy

Gary Guymon:

person. So I think right now my one year old, it's a little

Gary Guymon:

tough to tell, but my five year old, she displays quite a bit of

Gary Guymon:

those characteristics that I was hoping would would come out in

Gary Guymon:

her. So she's, he's very ambitious. She loves to learn,

Gary Guymon:

she's athletic, she just yelled at me the other day, it was our

Gary Guymon:

day off from exercising. And she said, even though it's your day

Gary Guymon:

off, you need to be active. And so it's just those little things

Gary Guymon:

that stick out to you. Or I talked to my kids quite a bit

Gary Guymon:

about what's going on in my life. And there was a deal that

Gary Guymon:

I was losing. And my daughter just tapped me on the shoulder

Gary Guymon:

and said, It's just money, daddy, wow, you just You gotta

Gary Guymon:

listen to them. Yeah. And understand what's important and

Gary Guymon:

try not to let things impact you the way that they may initially

Gary Guymon:

and just sort of take a step back and I'd say that's probably

Gary Guymon:

my most proud I love it. Love it. Love it. Your children your

Gary Guymon:

legacy. That is the thing that you are most proud of. That's

Gary Guymon:

amazing. My son gives me those little bits and pieces to I'll

Gary Guymon:

get I'll hold calling him like so mommy, what's this about?

Gary Guymon:

What's that about? So I love I love I love the little people.

Gary Guymon:

Gary, this conversation has been amazing. If people want to get

Gary Guymon:

in contact with you what is the one best way either LinkedIn or

Gary Guymon:

email is the easiest and best way to get in touch with me.

Gary Guymon:

Awesome. Awesome. Thank you so much for sharing your time and

Gary Guymon:

your experience with us on the transform sales podcast. We have

Gary Guymon:

definitely been enriched by learning from you today. Yeah,

Gary Guymon:

thanks for having me. And that was another episode of the

Gary Guymon:

transformed sales podcast. Remember in everything that you

Gary Guymon:

do, focus on the transformation within your sales organization.

Get Your FREE GUIDE to A Build High-Performance Sales Team

Highlights

  • From playing sports and traveling around California to becoming a sales manager (00:46)
  • Valuable lessons he got from working in retail that he applied in his first sales role (04:39)
  • Why it’s important for salespeople to focus more on bringing value to conversations with customers (06:42)
  • The marathon 8-hour interview that took him from accounting and retail to the telecom industry (08:09)
  • Pros and cons of working for a Fortune 100 company versus a small company (12:01)
  • His quick ascension from individual contributor to sales leader (15:32)
  • Learning to work with people to really succeed in building a great sales team (19:06)

In this episode of the Transformed Sales Podcast, I had a chat with Gary Guymon, the VP of Sales at Xfernet. Gary was born in Santa Clara, California and he grew up all over California. He played sports, ran track, played football, and was an editor of a literary magazine. He started a tax firm from the ground up centered all around the California enterprise program until 7 years later when the program was shut down. His business partner wanted to convert the tax firm into a traditional accounting firm which Gary was not interested in so he decided to be bought out by his partner. 

He then moved to Seattle, took a retail job, and was later contacted by NTT Communications for an inside sales rep job. Gary worked his way up to a global account manager until when he was recruited by Xfernet as a global sales manager and worked his way up to his current position. Gary and I will dive into his interesting sales career and how he went from being a tax firm owner to a sales leader. He will share his wisdom with us around why salespeople should focus more on gaining the trust of their potential customers instead of just talking about their product or service, how to build a fulfilling sales career, and his top strategies for being an effective sales leader. Stay tuned for that and more!

Quotes

“Most people have an idea of what they want anyway so it’s whether or not they trust you and what you’re selling” – Gary Guymon

“To succeed as a sales leader, you have to learn how to work with different people” – Gary Guymon

Learn More About Gary in the Links Below:

Connect with Wesleyne Greer:

  • Wesleyne’s Website – https://transformedsales.com/
  • Wesleyne on LinkedIn – https://www.linkedin.com/in/wesleynegreer/
  • Wesleyne on Facebook – https://web.facebook.com/wesleynegreer
  • Wesleyne on Twitter – https://twitter.com/wesleynegreer
  • Email Her at WGreer@TransformedSales.com
Transcript
Wesleyne Greer:

Welcome to another episode of the transform

Wesleyne Greer:

sales podcast today. I am so excited to have Gary Gaiman with

Wesleyne Greer:

me today. How are you, Gary? I'm doing well. And thanks for

Wesleyne Greer:

having me. How are you doing? Well, I'm doing well. Let me

Wesleyne Greer:

tell you a little bit about Gary. He was born in Santa

Wesleyne Greer:

Clara, California, and he grew up all over California. He

Wesleyne Greer:

played sports, ran track and played football and was an

Wesleyne Greer:

editor of the literary magazine. He started in accounting firms

Wesleyne Greer:

center all around the California Enterprise Program. He is now a

Wesleyne Greer:

sales manager at expert net. So, Gary, tell us how did you go

Wesleyne Greer:

from playing sports traveling around the state to becoming a

Wesleyne Greer:

sales manager? Yeah, so Well, I played sports in high school, I

Wesleyne Greer:

mostly coached in college, I ran a little bit of club track, and

Wesleyne Greer:

competed on that level. But I never ran collegiately. But I

Wesleyne Greer:

interned while I was in college at a tax accounting firm. And

Wesleyne Greer:

they specialize in the California enterprise zone,

Wesleyne Greer:

which really helped out economically distressed areas

Wesleyne Greer:

throughout California to help give them a tax credit. And it

Wesleyne Greer:

was something that that was very fulfilling. And it gave me an

Wesleyne Greer:

opportunity to have a career coming straight out of college

Wesleyne Greer:

and one of my mentors at the tax accounting firm, elected to

Wesleyne Greer:

start a new firm with me. So I got licensed as a tax preparer.

Wesleyne Greer:

And we started from the ground up, no customer base, no

Wesleyne Greer:

anything, just figured we could figure it out as we went along.

Wesleyne Greer:

And we built it from nothing and sustained it for about seven and

Wesleyne Greer:

a half years when the governor of California did elected to

Wesleyne Greer:

shut down the program. And my business partner at the time

Wesleyne Greer:

wanted to convert our tax firm into just a traditional

Wesleyne Greer:

accounting firm, which wasn't really something that I wanted

Wesleyne Greer:

to do. So I elected to sell him my portion of the company. And I

Wesleyne Greer:

just uprooted and went to Seattle, Washington, one of my

Wesleyne Greer:

buddies played football for the University of Washington and

Wesleyne Greer:

convinced me to move up there. So I went up just kind of took a

Wesleyne Greer:

retail job, sort of on a hiatus to figure out what I wanted to

Wesleyne Greer:

do. And my next career steps and I was contacted by a

Wesleyne Greer:

telecommunications company called NTT communications.

Wesleyne Greer:

They're a Japanese company, fortune 100. And I had never

Wesleyne Greer:

heard of them before. So I did some some research, it was very,

Wesleyne Greer:

very interesting. I'm the kind of person who likes to take

Wesleyne Greer:

opportunities based on how much I can learn and can grow in that

Wesleyne Greer:

industry. And being that the job that was presented to me was

Wesleyne Greer:

centered around the internet. And the internet is changing

Wesleyne Greer:

every single day. I mean, the growth potential is limitless.

Wesleyne Greer:

So I kind of jumped at the opportunity started at the

Wesleyne Greer:

bottom from an inside sales rep, and worked my way up to a global

Wesleyne Greer:

account manager. And then I was recruited by exponet, who was a

Wesleyne Greer:

customer of NTT communications. So I really hit it off with the

Wesleyne Greer:

CTO, they flew me out to Los Angeles to meet the CEO. And

Wesleyne Greer:

then we hit it off as well. I think my interview was about

Wesleyne Greer:

like seven or eight hours while I was down here, was went from

Wesleyne Greer:

dinner to rooftop of the building to just everywhere,

Wesleyne Greer:

just talking. And then needless to say, I accepted the position.

Wesleyne Greer:

But I originally started as a global sales manager, and then I

Wesleyne Greer:

worked my way up to what I am now as a VP of sales. So your

Wesleyne Greer:

journey in life, you started out as a as an accountant, and then

Wesleyne Greer:

you decided, okay, I don't want to do this anymore. I'm gonna

Wesleyne Greer:

take a different step. And you took a huge leap and just move

Wesleyne Greer:

to another state. So when you move to another state, and you

Wesleyne Greer:

decided to get into retail, did you miss anything about being in

Wesleyne Greer:

that accounting world? I think I kind of missed the just going

Wesleyne Greer:

after the customer base. I mean, you work in a retail store,

Wesleyne Greer:

people just walk in, they have a specific need. And your only job

Wesleyne Greer:

is to sort of upsell them, there is no real like, hunting

Wesleyne Greer:

involved in that. And I missed that. Because I mean, that was a

Wesleyne Greer:

huge part of what we did is we were cold calling going door to

Wesleyne Greer:

door back when that was still relevant. And that part of it

Wesleyne Greer:

was something that I found to really love and I missed that in

Wesleyne Greer:

the retail aspect of selling. You like cold calling. I don't

Wesleyne Greer:

know how many people that I can say hang their hat on. I missed

Wesleyne Greer:

cold calling when I had to cold call. I missed it. I don't think

Wesleyne Greer:

that's something a lot of people say. So getting into retail,

Wesleyne Greer:

then you move back into that business to business space. So

Wesleyne Greer:

what lessons did you extract from that retail sales

Wesleyne Greer:

environment that you actually employed when you worked for

Wesleyne Greer:

NTT?

Gary Guymon:

I think it was just being more personable. That was

Gary Guymon:

something I struggled with originally in my career path,

Gary Guymon:

but being in retail, you have to be personable otherwise You will

Gary Guymon:

not be successful. And that's something I kind of carried with

Gary Guymon:

me and I, I learned to kind of develop a sales style of selling

Gary Guymon:

myself and making sure that I'm a likable person and earning the

Gary Guymon:

trust of a customer, as opposed to trying to sell them a

Gary Guymon:

product, because I think most people have an idea of what they

Gary Guymon:

want anyway. So it's whether or not they trust you in what

Gary Guymon:

you're selling. And that's kind of something I learned in the

Gary Guymon:

retail world. That's so good. The likability the trust factor,

Gary Guymon:

because you're right, if I'm walking into a retail store, I

Gary Guymon:

can go next door and get the same thing. So why do I stop and

Gary Guymon:

say, Here's my credit card buy from me? And a lot of times in

Gary Guymon:

the b2b sales world that doesn't quite translate, it's like, ah,

Gary Guymon:

yeah, well, this is what I want to I want you to buy this, buy

Gary Guymon:

this buy this, it's all about the products. It's all about a

Gary Guymon:

future dump. But it seems like you took the those key skills

Gary Guymon:

you learn in the b2c world and translated them to the b2b

Gary Guymon:

world. That's correct. Yeah, I learned pretty quick too, at

Gary Guymon:

NTT, that most of the people that you're pitching and trying

Gary Guymon:

to sell know your product better than you do as a sales rep being

Gary Guymon:

that they're all technical. And they have to be very, very

Gary Guymon:

knowledgeable in what they do. So they're buying because at

Gary Guymon:

NTT, we were selling wholesale internet. And that product is

Gary Guymon:

something that they need to be well versed in. So for me to try

Gary Guymon:

to speak to them on their level is not something that I could do

Gary Guymon:

as a sales rep, starting out. So the only really selling point

Gary Guymon:

that I had was myself, and I just built my career off of

Gary Guymon:

that. That's good. That's so good. Because a lot of times in

Gary Guymon:

our technical realm, I was actually just working with a

Gary Guymon:

client today. And she was like, what, Wesleyne? I don't know

Gary Guymon:

this as much as they do. And I don't know this, and I don't

Gary Guymon:

know that and I'm like, Yeah, okay, you know, your world, they

Gary Guymon:

know their world, right? So let them stay in their space, and

Gary Guymon:

you have to bring value, you have to add things to them so

Gary Guymon:

that they're like, okay, this person isn't trying to act like

Gary Guymon:

they're the expert, like they know more than me, right?

Gary Guymon:

They're really just trying to help me achieve a goal that I

Gary Guymon:

want to accomplish. Right? Yeah. I've always found too, that

Gary Guymon:

coming from a sales rep, trying to be technical, trying to

Gary Guymon:

engulf yourself into a customer's world is almost a

Gary Guymon:

disservice. Right? It comes off kind of shady, almost in that

Gary Guymon:

you're trying to act as you're involved in their world. Whereas

Gary Guymon:

if you have a technical person, like a sales engineer speaking

Gary Guymon:

to what they do, it's almost trusted more. So I mean, it's

Gary Guymon:

kind of taking a step back, swallowing it a little bit of

Gary Guymon:

pride and just allowing things to organically move forward, as

Gary Guymon:

opposed to trying to overstep and speak about something you

Gary Guymon:

don't necessarily know about. Yeah, like you literally, you

Gary Guymon:

have to stay in your lane. And so you came from a very

Gary Guymon:

different world accounting than retail, and you stepped into

Gary Guymon:

this telecom world, and somebody saw something in you. And they

Gary Guymon:

said, Oh, yeah, you're pretty good at this, we want you to. So

Gary Guymon:

how did that marathon eight hour interview to walk me through

Gary Guymon:

that process? What was that like?

Wesleyne Greer:

Well, it was kind of intimidating at first.

Wesleyne Greer:

So they put me up at a hotel across the street from the

Wesleyne Greer:

office. And I walked in kind of expecting to just be greeted,

Wesleyne Greer:

you know, by reception, or be sat down and then just go into a

Wesleyne Greer:

room like a traditional interview. And I walked in, and

Wesleyne Greer:

I was greeted, and they took me around on a tour through a data

Wesleyne Greer:

center, which I was not expecting at all. But extranet

Wesleyne Greer:

owns and operates a 10,000 square foot data center. And

Wesleyne Greer:

I've been to a few I've been to New York, I went to one 11/8,

Wesleyne Greer:

which is now owned and operated by Google, and the security

Wesleyne Greer:

level at our data center was a lot higher than anything I've

Wesleyne Greer:

experienced. So that initial aspect of it was pretty

Wesleyne Greer:

intimidating. And then just coming in, I went into the CEOs

Wesleyne Greer:

office and he sat me down he had a couch in his in his office and

Wesleyne Greer:

that was kind of where the interview started. And it threw

Wesleyne Greer:

me off a little bit just the comfortability, this the person

Wesleyne Greer:

ability in the interview, but he's extremely friendly,

Wesleyne Greer:

extremely likeable, kind of ease any sort of stresses from the

Wesleyne Greer:

get go. And we just started chatting he was he was first

Wesleyne Greer:

trying to pick my brain trying to see how much I understood

Wesleyne Greer:

about the industry, how much I understood about his business

Wesleyne Greer:

versus what NTT offered, I mean, coming from a fortune 100

Wesleyne Greer:

company to a company that's not even publicly traded. It's a

Wesleyne Greer:

huge change in environment, not only in, in status of the

Wesleyne Greer:

company, but also in the customer base that you're

Wesleyne Greer:

targeting. So he was trying to grasp whether or not I would be

Wesleyne Greer:

able to make that adjustment and if I'd be successful at his

Wesleyne Greer:

company, so once he was able to determine that he brought in the

Wesleyne Greer:

CTO who picked my brain on a more technical level, we start

Wesleyne Greer:

We're talking more about the ins and outs of what IP transit

Wesleyne Greer:

actually was versus peering relationships, which is just a

Wesleyne Greer:

different component of the internet. And we talked back and

Wesleyne Greer:

forth on how we could grow the company with our goals kind of

Wesleyne Greer:

aligned, and it would be a good fit. And then he just took me

Wesleyne Greer:

out to dinner where we kind of just continued conversations,

Wesleyne Greer:

and at the end of the day, he ended up extending an offer. So

Wesleyne Greer:

it's almost like they, yes, they were interviewing you. And

Wesleyne Greer:

they're kind of trying to sell you too, right? And especially

Wesleyne Greer:

in today's job market, where we are I mean, this is an

Wesleyne Greer:

employee's market, right? I don't even know if that's a

Wesleyne Greer:

coined term, but it is this is an employee's market. So as

Wesleyne Greer:

leaders, when we think about, okay, how can I provide a

Wesleyne Greer:

different experience for a candidate that I know I want?

Wesleyne Greer:

And so maybe it's not like, Hey, you come into a hotel, and you

Wesleyne Greer:

spend the whole day with us, but really getting to meet with

Wesleyne Greer:

upper leadership and understanding from upper

Wesleyne Greer:

leadership? These are our goals, this is our mission, these are

Wesleyne Greer:

our values. Would you say that those things are we have reasons

Wesleyne Greer:

why you decided, hey, I'm gonna move on back to California, I'm

Wesleyne Greer:

gonna take a different step. Oh, yeah, for sure. I think that

Wesleyne Greer:

just how much we kind of hit it off from an environment

Wesleyne Greer:

standpoint, and just how welcoming how friendly

Wesleyne Greer:

everything was, how easygoing the environment was, was very

Wesleyne Greer:

appealing to me at the time, it still is, it's still something

Wesleyne Greer:

that I value more than anything. And also going through a

Wesleyne Greer:

pandemic at a company, you're always worried on how they're

Wesleyne Greer:

going to handle things. And it's translated, you know, through

Wesleyne Greer:

the years to where my upper management has allowed me to

Wesleyne Greer:

work from home. Just been super accommodating to every concern

Wesleyne Greer:

that we've ever had. And just, it's really something that they

Wesleyne Greer:

sold and lived up to while being there at the company. So I was

Wesleyne Greer:

the next question, I was going to ask you the difference

Wesleyne Greer:

between that large, publicly traded company and your company,

Wesleyne Greer:

because again, a lot of people are in that transition point in

Wesleyne Greer:

their career where they're looking for something different,

Wesleyne Greer:

something new, what would you say the pros and cons of both

Wesleyne Greer:

sides are?

Gary Guymon:

Well, I think the pros of being at a smaller

Gary Guymon:

company is probably there's a lot more more freedom to what

Gary Guymon:

you're able to do. And I say that because you can build case

Gary Guymon:

studies, you can build how you pitch things, whereas when

Gary Guymon:

you're at a fortune 100 company, it's more scripted, they have an

Gary Guymon:

idea of how you want to pitch things, how they want you to

Gary Guymon:

operate, how you have to manage certain customers, or whatever

Gary Guymon:

it may be. And that responsibility, I think that

Gary Guymon:

that can be deterring unless it fits your sales style to have

Gary Guymon:

everything sort of planned out for you. For me, that is kind of

Gary Guymon:

deterring, I like to kind of fit my sales style to the customer,

Gary Guymon:

as opposed to just having something kind of planned out

Gary Guymon:

and how you approach every single person. I think it's

Gary Guymon:

very, very subjective. And I think that's kind of lost that

Gary Guymon:

at a larger company, you don't you don't have the freedom to be

Gary Guymon:

able to talk to people that way. I think a con is always you're

Gary Guymon:

worried about stability? Are you worried about being bought by

Gary Guymon:

another company? Like if there's a merger, if there's an

Gary Guymon:

acquisition, how is that going to change my life? Am I still

Gary Guymon:

going to be employed am I going to be out of a job, you know,

Gary Guymon:

and all of those things go on behind the scenes, and you may

Gary Guymon:

or may not be privy to it, depending on your status at the

Gary Guymon:

company. And depending on how transparent leadership is with

Gary Guymon:

you. I think that's probably one of the more bigger concerns I

Gary Guymon:

had. Initially. It's not something that I share now. But

Gary Guymon:

the biggest thing is just finding the right fit for you

Gary Guymon:

and what you want in your career path. Yeah, I was speaking with

Gary Guymon:

someone who is looking for new people within the organization.

Gary Guymon:

And when I was talking about to them, I'm like, Hey, you have to

Gary Guymon:

remember you're a large enterprise. If you find somebody

Gary Guymon:

who's come from like a startup realm or a smaller company,

Gary Guymon:

they're used to doing things, marching off their own beat,

Gary Guymon:

that doesn't happen here. There's a lot of red tape.

Gary Guymon:

There's a lot of stuff that a salesperson has to go through in

Gary Guymon:

order to get something done. So you really want to think about

Gary Guymon:

the culture fit is not just what you can do, but that culture fit

Gary Guymon:

is going to help you get employees and keep them much,

Gary Guymon:

much longer. Right. Yeah, no culture is a huge part of it. I

Gary Guymon:

mean, even at NTT, there's a lot of things like you had to

Gary Guymon:

dissect each opportunity. You had to dissect calls. They were

Gary Guymon:

part of a Miller Heiman process, if you're familiar with that,

Gary Guymon:

where you fill out green sheets for calls and you have to

Gary Guymon:

outline what the reason is for having the call. He had blue

Gary Guymon:

sheets for opportunities and it's just all of that is

Gary Guymon:

extremely valuable if you use it correctly, but can be extremely

Gary Guymon:

tedious if you're applying it to just like say like an

Gary Guymon:

introductory call, which you're required to do, right. But yeah,

Gary Guymon:

here at extranet that's not part of my process. There are Some

Gary Guymon:

elements that I've taken from that and still use, but I don't

Gary Guymon:

think all of it is applicable or necessary in every single

Gary Guymon:

opportunity. Well, yeah, one of the great things about sales

Gary Guymon:

leadership is you're like, I really like this, but I really

Gary Guymon:

don't like that. So I'm not gonna ever do that, again, I'm

Gary Guymon:

not gonna make my team do that, because it's just so annoying.

Gary Guymon:

So tell me about your ascent from individual contributor to

Gary Guymon:

leader? Because it seems like it happened pretty quickly with you

Gary Guymon:

moving to extranet. Yeah, so just starting out, I started out

Gary Guymon:

pretty successful at the company, not nearly as

Gary Guymon:

successful as I was hoping to be, but to say the least, they

Gary Guymon:

were happy with my performance. And I kind of put together a

Gary Guymon:

proposal to create a position which was VP of sales,

Gary Guymon:

everything kind of operated independently, whether that was

Gary Guymon:

channel whether that was just outside sales, or inside sales.

Gary Guymon:

And I wanted to kind of put everything under one umbrella

Gary Guymon:

and expand and start hiring people. So I put together a

Gary Guymon:

proposal, I pitched my boss, and he was all for it, he was

Gary Guymon:

actually thinking of doing something similar to what my

Gary Guymon:

proposal was about. But he said he loved the idea. And let's

Gary Guymon:

just run with it and see where it goes. Hmm, being your own

Gary Guymon:

advocate. So often, employees, people just sit back and they

Gary Guymon:

wait for the company to say, Okay, there's a new position

Gary Guymon:

we've created. But if you never speak up and use your words, and

Gary Guymon:

say, This is the vision I have for the organization, then how

Gary Guymon:

will you ever be thought of as a leader, if you're not thinking

Gary Guymon:

about leadership initiatives? So you said, this is the plan I

Gary Guymon:

have? This is what I want to do. And your boss said, Go do it. So

Gary Guymon:

how did you start building this organization? Starting with,

Gary Guymon:

okay, it's me, but I want all of these people. Can you say that

Gary Guymon:

again? So how did you go about taking the plan that you gave to

Gary Guymon:

your leader to say I want to make the sales organization and

Gary Guymon:

what were some of the first things that you did to start

Gary Guymon:

building out the sales team.

Gary Guymon:

So I put together a plan to hire employees, I put together a

Gary Guymon:

bunch of ROIs on when he can see his return on investment. And

Gary Guymon:

then I also I put together a bunch of training materials, a

Gary Guymon:

company story, started putting together marketing plans that I

Gary Guymon:

was, I was hoping to accomplish to give all sales reps sort of a

Gary Guymon:

head start in obtaining the goals that I had set out for

Gary Guymon:

them. So I built a company story, I built a training deck

Gary Guymon:

going over every single service that we offer, and just sort of

Gary Guymon:

presented this all to him to where I was able to implement it

Gary Guymon:

just from the start. And just any person that we on boarded

Gary Guymon:

was able to go through these training materials and just have

Gary Guymon:

a whole process put in front of them to hit the ground running

Gary Guymon:

and be successful from day one. Wow. So you really focused on I

Gary Guymon:

want to build a house before the people actually come right. You

Gary Guymon:

wanted to give them the infrastructure. And I think that

Gary Guymon:

that's something that so many organizations miss. It's like,

Gary Guymon:

oh, no, no, we'll hire all the people. And then we'll figure

Gary Guymon:

out what they do when they get here. Right? No, I think that's,

Gary Guymon:

I mean, it works for some people, right. So I mean, even

Gary Guymon:

when I came on board, extranet it wasn't, there wasn't a plan

Gary Guymon:

in place. And it was sort of like, here's your desk, get to

Gary Guymon:

work kind of ordeal. And I was fortunate to already have a

Gary Guymon:

relationship with the CTO, so any questions that I had, or any

Gary Guymon:

anything that I felt that I need training on, he was very

Gary Guymon:

communicative, and in gave me that opportunity. Whereas I

Gary Guymon:

don't I don't think, had it been a different situation where I

Gary Guymon:

didn't know him as well as I did. I could have been as

Gary Guymon:

successful as I was to start. So I wanted to make sure anybody we

Gary Guymon:

onboard, it had that opportunity to just start and just be

Gary Guymon:

confident in what they were pitching and be successful. So

Gary Guymon:

as you've gone through this journey of building this team

Gary Guymon:

from scratch and building all their playbooks and collaterals

Gary Guymon:

what are some of the challenges that you had to overcome? Um, I

Gary Guymon:

think it's a it's just kind of learning how to work with

Gary Guymon:

people, because everybody's different, you know, you can't

Gary Guymon:

treat everybody the same. Some people like, like tough

Gary Guymon:

encouraged me, they like to be called out on what they what

Gary Guymon:

they're doing wrong. Some people like to stop positive

Gary Guymon:

reinforcement. I think that that has been my my biggest struggle

Gary Guymon:

is trying to learn how to speak to everybody. Because if you

Gary Guymon:

treat everybody the same, then you're going to fail and people

Gary Guymon:

you're going to have a lot of churn in your organization. So

Gary Guymon:

trying to understand that in training, I think focusing on on

Gary Guymon:

where people are not understanding everything and

Gary Guymon:

focus more heavily on that has been been a little difficult,

Gary Guymon:

and then just being able to provide assistance while while

Gary Guymon:

doing my own job as well. So I like to accompany sales reps on

Gary Guymon:

phone calls whenever they need support, and also just continue

Gary Guymon:

doing my job. So balancing everything, it's been a bit of a

Gary Guymon:

struggle, but making it work. Yeah, and one of the things that

Gary Guymon:

I really love to say is that every salesperson is an

Gary Guymon:

individual. And because they're all individuals, every single

Gary Guymon:

person on the team needs to have their customized coaching plan.

Gary Guymon:

So you as a leader know how to best show up and serve them to

Gary Guymon:

help them achieve their goals. And it seems like very early on,

Gary Guymon:

you realize that and you adjusted your style for each

Gary Guymon:

person on the team. Yeah, no, I like to, I like to ask people

Gary Guymon:

what it is that they're really trying to accomplish in life,

Gary Guymon:

not in the company. And like, for one example, I had a rep who

Gary Guymon:

wanted to buy a home in a year. So I broke everything down,

Gary Guymon:

asked him how much the home would cost, how much money he

Gary Guymon:

wanted to put down and just kind of laid it out. And I said,

Gary Guymon:

Okay, well, here's your goal for the month, I'm like, Don't worry

Gary Guymon:

about your quota, because your quota is less than what you need

Gary Guymon:

to hit to be able to accomplish this in a year. And I said, so

Gary Guymon:

this is what you want to accomplish, then go ahead, let's

Gary Guymon:

work towards it, let's find a way to make it happen. And

Gary Guymon:

people are more receptive to achieving something that means

Gary Guymon:

something to them than being motivated by fear. If you don't

Gary Guymon:

hit your quota, you're going to be fired kind of motivation is

Gary Guymon:

it works, but I don't think it's the best way to approach

Gary Guymon:

managing people. So like I said, with this particular instance,

Gary Guymon:

he had a goal in mind to buy a home, which would have put them

Gary Guymon:

at 150% of quota anyway, so why not make that his goal? That's

Gary Guymon:

powerful. That is powerful. You have had such a diverse career,

Gary Guymon:

from accounting to retail sales, to really creating your own

Gary Guymon:

team, what is the thing that you are most excited about having

Gary Guymon:

accomplished either personally or professionally in your life?

Gary Guymon:

That's a tough question. I'd say probably personally, just being

Gary Guymon:

a father. So I have two kids, I like to think that I'm teaching

Gary Guymon:

them the things that I wish that I had when I was a child and

Gary Guymon:

helping them grow into a responsible and just healthy

Gary Guymon:

person. So I think right now my one year old, it's a little

Gary Guymon:

tough to tell, but my five year old, she displays quite a bit of

Gary Guymon:

those characteristics that I was hoping would would come out in

Gary Guymon:

her. So she's, he's very ambitious. She loves to learn,

Gary Guymon:

she's athletic, she just yelled at me the other day, it was our

Gary Guymon:

day off from exercising. And she said, even though it's your day

Gary Guymon:

off, you need to be active. And so it's just those little things

Gary Guymon:

that stick out to you. Or I talked to my kids quite a bit

Gary Guymon:

about what's going on in my life. And there was a deal that

Gary Guymon:

I was losing. And my daughter just tapped me on the shoulder

Gary Guymon:

and said, It's just money, daddy, wow, you just You gotta

Gary Guymon:

listen to them. Yeah. And understand what's important and

Gary Guymon:

try not to let things impact you the way that they may initially

Gary Guymon:

and just sort of take a step back and I'd say that's probably

Gary Guymon:

my most proud I love it. Love it. Love it. Your children your

Gary Guymon:

legacy. That is the thing that you are most proud of. That's

Gary Guymon:

amazing. My son gives me those little bits and pieces to I'll

Gary Guymon:

get I'll hold calling him like so mommy, what's this about?

Gary Guymon:

What's that about? So I love I love I love the little people.

Gary Guymon:

Gary, this conversation has been amazing. If people want to get

Gary Guymon:

in contact with you what is the one best way either LinkedIn or

Gary Guymon:

email is the easiest and best way to get in touch with me.

Gary Guymon:

Awesome. Awesome. Thank you so much for sharing your time and

Gary Guymon:

your experience with us on the transform sales podcast. We have

Gary Guymon:

definitely been enriched by learning from you today. Yeah,

Gary Guymon:

thanks for having me. And that was another episode of the

Gary Guymon:

transformed sales podcast. Remember in everything that you

Gary Guymon:

do, focus on the transformation within your sales organization.

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